Device from Massachusetts medical company saving lives worldwide

Jefferey Metcalfe

One of the leading medical instrument companies in the world is located right here in Massachusetts. One of its products, which is no larger than the end of a ballpoint pen, is saving lives all over the globe. Inside a teaching lab at Abiomed in Danvers, Massachusetts, Dr. Bobbie Chapman demonstrates how the latest iteration of the cutting-edge technology is saving lives. In the event of a medical emergency like a heart attack, Abiomed’s nearly microscopic device, also known as an impella, is sent into a patient’s heart which can then pump critically-needed blood throughout the body. “It goes anywhere from 23,000 revolutions per minute up to 46,000 revolutions per minute,” Chapman said. As the pump provides blood to the organs and brain, it also aids in stabilizing the patient and can help the heart recover. “Being able to recover someone’s heart, God’s the best engineer and that’s the best solution for the patient,” Mike Minogue, the president of Abiomed said. Minogue said this groundbreaking technology first discovered about five years ago has only improved since then. “It’s smaller, it’s smarter and it’s more connected,” Minogue said. That connection now coming from the cloud. Currently, doctors in 1,500 hospitals around the world can track and monitor, in real-time, a patient’s condition. “I’m very excited for what the future holds because we built a platform now that will enable us to the global standard of care,” Minogue said. The evolution of the technology is only part of the story at Aboimed. In his 18 years with the company, Minogue said it has always been about putting the patient first.That’s why becoming an industry leader is only a part of the ultimate goal. “We are not only saving lives, but we’re recovering people’s hearts, so they’re able to go home with their own heart,” Minogue said. Abiomed continues to grow and it’s not just with their existing products.For example, during COVID-19, they actually bought two technology companies and added over 300 employees to their ranks.

One of the leading medical instrument companies in the world is located right here in Massachusetts. One of its products, which is no larger than the end of a ballpoint pen, is saving lives all over the globe.

Inside a teaching lab at Abiomed in Danvers, Massachusetts, Dr. Bobbie Chapman demonstrates how the latest iteration of the cutting-edge technology is saving lives.

In the event of a medical emergency like a heart attack, Abiomed’s nearly microscopic device, also known as an impella, is sent into a patient’s heart which can then pump critically-needed blood throughout the body.

“It goes anywhere from 23,000 revolutions per minute up to 46,000 revolutions per minute,” Chapman said.

As the pump provides blood to the organs and brain, it also aids in stabilizing the patient and can help the heart recover.

microscopic device known as an impella

“Being able to recover someone’s heart, God’s the best engineer and that’s the best solution for the patient,” Mike Minogue, the president of Abiomed said.

Minogue said this groundbreaking technology first discovered about five years ago has only improved since then.

“It’s smaller, it’s smarter and it’s more connected,” Minogue said.

That connection now coming from the cloud.

Currently, doctors in 1,500 hospitals around the world can track and monitor, in real-time, a patient’s condition.

“I’m very excited for what the future holds because we built a platform now that will enable us to the global standard of care,” Minogue said.

The evolution of the technology is only part of the story at Aboimed.

In his 18 years with the company, Minogue said it has always been about putting the patient first.

That’s why becoming an industry leader is only a part of the ultimate goal.

“We are not only saving lives, but we’re recovering people’s hearts, so they’re able to go home with their own heart,” Minogue said.

Abiomed continues to grow and it’s not just with their existing products.

For example, during COVID-19, they actually bought two technology companies and added over 300 employees to their ranks.

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